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The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

Posted on August 14th, 2017
Review by Linda F. Burghardt for Jewish Book Council (NOW IN PAPERBACK)
 
 

Best-selling author Kristin Hannah is known for her mother-daughter fiction and her sensitive probing of the relationship of sisters. In The Nightingale, her twenty-first novel, she uses her considerable skill as a storyteller to transport us to France during World War II and bring us the story of Isabelle and Viann, who are sisters but not friends. The result is an epic love story and family drama that portrays two young French women who are plunged into unimaginable chaos by a country at war, yet who must find within themselves the courage to face the forces of destruction in order to keep their families together.


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Writers Without Borders

Posted on August 7th, 2017
BY SANDEE BRAWARSKY for The Jewish Week


Plotlines that cross over seamlessly between the U.S. and Israel.


There are the writers living in Israel, like David Grossman, Etgar Keret, Amos Oz and A.B. Yehoshua, whose Hebrew words are translated into many languages and published around the world. There are other widely published authors writing from Israel in Arabic. Then there are Israeli writers, penning their works from New York, in Hebrew, and native English speakers who have made Israel their home, writing their books in English and publishing them mostly abroad. And, just as North American Jewish writers of the last century, such as Herman Wouk, set some of their work in Israel, their contemporary counterparts are placing characters in the landscape of the Negev and the streets of Tel Aviv.

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The Afterlife of Stars by Joseph Kertes

Posted on July 31st, 2017
Review by Reinhild Draeger-Muenke for Jewish Book Council


I opened Joseph Kertes’ novel The Afterlife of Stars at 4:05 on a quiet Saturday afternoon, vaguely curious about the story—and finished it at 9:20 that same evening, not having paid attention to anything in the meantime excerpt the spellbinding story of the Beck family, told by its youngest member, “9.8”-year-old Robert. This unexpected level of absorption seems just about adequate to honor the emotional intensity experienced by three generations of Becks during one month in 1956. Forced to flee Budapest at the beginning of the Hungarian revolution, they make their way to Canada via Paris. (Kertes himself fled as a child in 1956 with his parents from Budapest to Canada, and one wonders how much of the events described in the novel actually happened in real life.)    

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Quiz: Which Summer Book Should You Read Next?

Posted on July 24th, 2017
Created by Katie Brown for Jewish Book Council


Which Summer Book Are You?


Answer these questions to find out which JBC summer book you should read next!
 

9 Jewish books to read this summer

Posted on July 17th, 2017
By Victor Wishna for JTA


Sure, winter might seem like the ideal time of year for curling up with a good book — but summer is when you might actually have time to read.

So before these warm months all too swiftly fade to fall, here are some Jewish-themed titles, from a wide range of genres, to fill your beach bag (or tablet) for the season.

A bonus: These works, from an international smattering of authors, are equally enjoyable while riding in an overcrowded bus on your way to work.

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Did You Know...?

Beth El is raising funds for a new playground?

With seed money from Cantor Jason Kaufman's concert, the JCCNV was able to start a fund with all proceeds going towards a new playground for the preschool.  If you would like to donate towards this very worthy project, simply send your donations to Beth El Hebrew Congregation and notate "Playground."  If you donate on line, the playground fund is first on the list!

 

Lifelong Learning

Wednesdays during the school year @ 7:00 PM
See calendar for exact dates and subjects

 

ALIVE!

For more information about ALIVE! go to alive-inc.org.

 

Beth El House

For more information go to https://www.bethelhebrew.org/community/beth-el-house

Beth El House enables formerly homeless families to work toward self-sufficiency and confidence.

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United We Stand

 

Beth El Hebrew Congregation stands with the residents of Charlottesville in denouncing hatred. The truly shameful behavior of neo Nazi groups that descended upon the city was the latest example of domestic terrorism designed to further divide our nation. We believe that all people regardless of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or religious affiliation are an asset to the social fabric of the United States. Any attempt by hate groups to deny the rights of citizens will always fail because our fundamental beliefs in liberty and equality. Our prayers go out to the families of Heather Heyer,  Lt. H. Jay Cullen, and Berke M.M. Bates, along with all the counter protesters who were hurt.

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HIGH HOLIDAY FORMS

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NON-MEMBER TICKET REQUEST

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TO JOIN BROTHERHOOD OR SISTERHOOD CLICK HERE

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Summer services

begin at 6:30 PM

Services will not be streamed until the end of August due to renovations. We look forward to being with you towards the end of August.

 

upcoming events
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HIGH HOLIDAY CHOIR SCHEDULE

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SUMMER SOUL SHABBAT

August 11 @ 6:30 PM

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NEIGHBORHOOD COFFEE

Sunday, August 13 @ 2:00 PM

Contact the office for information

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CHAPEL IN THE WOODS WORKDAY

Sunday, August 27 @ 10:00 AM

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2017-18 WRJ PAID-UP MEMBER OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, September 9

1:00 PM to 3:00 PM

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NORTHERN VIRGINIA BREAKFAST FOR ISRAEL

at the JCC of Northern Virginia

Sunday, September 10 @ 10:00 AM

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WRJ/Brandeis BOOK & AUTHOR EVENT

Sunday, October 29

2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

 


There are activities, meetings, services and seminars at Beth El each week, ranging from service opportunities to Jewish learning and education, drawing members and guests from throughout the Washington, D.C. area.

the full calendar