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Liberal Orthodox Synagogue Will Stop Announcing LGBT Weddings After OU Complains

LGBTQ - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
BY BEN SALES for The Jewish Week


A flagship liberal Orthodox synagogue in New York will stop congratulating same-sex couples on their weddings following a complaint by the Orthodox Union.

The Hebrew Institute of Riverdale in the Bronx will no longer announce the weddings of its LGBT members in its newsletters in accordance with a policy dictated by the O.U., the largest association of Orthodox synagogues in the United States. The policy was set out this month in response to complaints from other member synagogues, which take a harder line on opposing same-sex marriage.

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Is Our Happiness Not Worth A ‘Mazal Tov’?

LGBTQ - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
BY ARI SHANE WEITZ for The Jewish Week


Same-sex marriage, homophobia and an Orthodox shul bulletin.


The “mazal tov” in the shul bulletin was unremarkable. It was the second of seven such congratulations in the Nov. 3, 2017 issue of Hebrew Institute of Riverdale’s Bayit Bulletin, sandwiched between one to the parents and grandparents of a bar mitzvah boy, and one to the parents of a new son (and to the newborn’s big sister). It was the same point size and type face as all the others, and there was no rainbow flag next to it.

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JQY

LGBTQ - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
From JQY


DROP-IN CENTER


In May 2016, JQY launched the only Drop-in Center for at-risk Jewish teens and young adults. This unique program, based at Congregation Bet Simchat Torah in Midtown Manhattan, is a space in which teens and young adults, ages 13 to 23, can:

Check in with licensed social workers
Meet others they can relate to
Participate in support groups
Have access to health and safety resources
Enjoy a hot kosher meal
Be part of an affirming community


Our participants come from Jewish communities across the Orthodox spectrum- from Borough Park to Teaneck, Staten Island to Riverdale, Cedarhurst to New Rochelle.

Many struggle with depression, anxiety, abuse, homelessness, self-harm, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, isolation, loneliness, or despair.

 

You are not alone.

 

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Jewish Festivals 2018 - 2019 Calendar

Jewish-Arts-and-Media - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
From everfest.com

 

From Tucson to Mobile, from Denver to Miami, there are Jewish film festivals, music festivals, food festivals, and more, all over the country. If there's none near you, take a vacation.  Keep up on all the Jewish Festivals with everfest.

 

Matzah Ball Pho Recipe

Jewish-Food - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
BY SONYA SANFORD for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 


Jewish and Vietnamese comfort food meet in one delicious bowl.


Growing up in Seattle, it’s easy to fall in love with pho. Nearly as ubiquitous as coffee shops or teriyaki spots (yes, teriyaki), pho restaurants seem to be just around every corner of the city. They welcome you in from the cold and the rain with their steamy glass windows and equally steamy giant bowls of soup.

Pho (pronounced fuh) is a traditional Vietnamese soup that was popularized around the world by Vietnamese refugees fleeing the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Pho Ga is the chicken noodle variety of the soup. For me, pho is the perfect meal: a big bowl of rich aromatic, sweet, salty broth filled with satisfying rice noodles and tender meat, and balanced by toppings of fresh herbs, crispy bean sprouts, and tart lime juice.

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I Use the Three-Letter Word with My Kids

Children-and-Familes - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
BY DEBRA FERTIG for Kveller


In our home, we talk about God as if He is a member of our extended family, like Zeydie or Uncle Maury. We also talk about the soul. Our boys, who are 6 and 9, ask questions that are impossible to answer:

“Mom, how do you know God is real? Does He talk to you?”

“Mom, how do you know there is a place we go to when we die?”

“Mom, how do you know that my soul will always be alive?”

“I don’t know exactly how,” I respond. “It’s more of a feeling than anything else.”

This seems to be enough for my kids. At least for now, at these ages.

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New Book Club Discussion Guide and the 2017-2018 National Jewish Book Club

Jewish-Books - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
Jewish Book Council


Aside from the book and your friends, asking questions about what you’ve read is, obviously, a key to any good book club. The right questions can keep your book club lively and engaged (and avoid any awkward silences). And since no one wants to sit through a book club discussion that is halting and uninspiring, we have discussion questions available for all of the titles below, plus some general questions that you can use to start a conversation on any book. CLICK BELOW for the complete selection of discussion questions. 


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The Best YA Novels with Jewish Protagonists

Jewish-Books - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
Rachel Lynn Solomon for Jewish Book Council


Growing up, I only saw Jewish protagonists in Holocaust literature. The kind of books I loved—realistic YA—occasionally had a main character with a Jewish friend, but that was it.

While I don’t believe we should ever stop writing about the Holocaust, for a long time, that was the only narrative I thought we had as Jewish people. People like me didn’t get to be protagonists. For a while, this stuck in my mind: the first four manuscripts I wrote before my debut, You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone, had no Jewish characters.

But there is so much richness to explore in a modern setting that hasn’t been explored nearly enough. The following novels feature my favorite representations of Judaism in contemporary realistic YA.

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2,700-Year-Old Jewish Seal Found in Jerusalem

Israeli-News - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
By Liel Leibovitz for Tablet Magazine


History, too, recognizes the city as the Jewish capital


Earlier this week, Israeli archaeologists revealed a recently discovered 2,700-year-old clay seal impression, unearthed not far from the Western Wall and belonging, according to the inscription, to one of the governors of Jerusalem mentioned in the bible.

About as big as a small coin, the seal carries an inscription in Hebrew that reads “belonging to the governor of the city.” Having studied it, Hebrew University professor Tallay Ornan and Tel Aviv University Professor Benjamin Sass described the image it depicts: “Above a double line are two standing men, facing each other in a mirror-like manner. Their heads are depicted as large dots, lacking any details. The hands facing outward are dropped down, and the hands facing inward are raised. Each of the figures is wearing a striped, knee-length garment.”

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Morocco’s little idyll of Jewish-Muslim coexistence

Interfaith - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
From economist.com. This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline "Shalom alaykum"

A moment of religious harmony


Essaouira sets an example for the rest of the Middle East

 


ONCE a year the little seaside town of Essaouira, in Morocco, reclaims its lost Jewish community. Sephardic trills echo from its whitewashed synagogues. The medieval souks fill with Jewish skullcaps. Rabbis and cantors wish Muslims “Shabbat Shalom” and regale them with Hebrew incantations. “It’s our culture,” says a merchant from Marrakech, who travelled 200km (124 miles) to hear them this year.

The revival is the initiative of André Azoulay, a 76-year-old Jew from Essaouira (one of just three) and a former counsellor to Morocco’s kings. Each autumn he stages a colourful festival of Andalusian music aimed at bringing hundreds of Jews and Muslims together for a weekend of concerts and dialogue. Locals pack the small stadium to watch Hebrew cantors and Koran-reciters sing arm-in-arm. Israelis and Palestinians flock there, too. “Essaouira is what the Middle East once was and might yet be again,” says Mr Azoulay.

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Why the Terms CE and BCE Replaced AD and BC, and Why Jews Care About It

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
Philologos, for Mosaic


It’s not why you think.


Viktor Kappel, a reader of Mosaic, writes:

I am a Christian who happens to believe that the Jewish people are indeed God-chosen. Please explain to me, though, why it has become so important to a part of this people to replace AD and BC with CE and BCE. I believe that this is not helpful to the Jewish cause.

As a Jew, I must say that I sympathize with the Jew in the story who, while reciting the words “Thou has chosen us among all people” in the holiday kiddush, stops, raises his arms to heaven, and asks in exasperation, “Why don’t You pick on someone else for a change?” Still, I welcome Mr. Kappel’s question. Since, between this column and my next, 2017 CE or AD will become 2018 AD or CE, it couldn’t have been timelier.

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Israelis debut an autonomous robotic submarine

Going-Green-Jewishly - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am

By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c
 
 


Ben-Gurion University launches company to commercialize the unique underwater vehicle for research, security, communications or military uses.


Under the surface of waterways across the globe, small remotely operated submarines are busy checking pipelines, mapping underwater minefields, taking geological and biological samples, scouting locations for communication cables, and searching for sunken vessels.


A group of 20 undergraduate and graduate engineering students from Ben-Gurion University in the Negev saw that existing autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have several limitations and they worked with Prof. Hugo Guterman in BGU’s Laboratory for Autonomous Robotics (LAR) to build a better model.


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FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE TOGETHER

Going-Green-Jewishly - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
From jpost.com


MIDBAR-the Swiss Society for the Revival of Desert Areas embarks on a tour of the Negev with KKL-JNF to learn how the organization combats desertification in Israel.

Combating desertification is one of the central values KKL-JNF has championed under its banner. Friends the world over aid KKL-JNF in combating desertification, and one of the most prominent  among them is MIDBAR - the Swiss Society for the Revival of Desert Areas.

Over the past several years, MIDBAR has supported several projects including planting a grove of trees in the green belt surrounding Beersheba, plantings in the Duda’im Forest and soil conservation and tree plantings along the Karkur Stream. 

“When I see the trees grow here in the middle of the desert, I draw strength from them”, said Armand Rudolf von Rohr, CEO of MIDBAR, during a study tour of the Negev with KKL-JNF. “I believe that trees are the natural solution to global warming.”


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Whose Jerusalem?

Feature-Article - Mon, 01/08/2018 - 12:00am
BY LILI KALISH GERSCH for myjewishlearning.com 


A history of Jerusalem since Israel's establishment.


Following the 1948 War of Independence, the Israelis declared military control over West Jerusalem, extending the law of Israel to the territory for purposes of administration. Palestinian notables called on King Abdullah of Transjordan to annex eastern Jerusalem, and meetings with the Israelis were arranged in order to discuss the terms of the truce and perhaps plan for a peace agreement. While a peace agreement was not reached, Israel and Transjordan did sign an armistice agreement in April of 1949, freezing the borders of Jerusalem and formalizing the partition of the city.

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Jewish Foods of the Red Sea

Jewish-Food - Tue, 01/02/2018 - 7:54am
BY ALY MILLER for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 

 


With the popularity of Israeli cuisine, the Jewish foods of Yemen, Ethiopia and Egypt are becoming more and more well-known. Buzzy ingredients like hawaij, turmeric and the fruity liquor called arak have made their way into North American cupboards. The history of food in this region is celebrated and explored here.

In these desert-like regions, Jewish cooking was shaped by the hot, arid climate and trade with India. Turmeric, curry powder and fenugreek are all prominently used in soups and stews of the region. Cool, refreshing vegetable salads that combated the desert heat became common fare in Jewish Egyptian communities.

Broaden your culinary repertoire with some Nosher recipes that come from these parts of the world:

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Why food makers in Portugal are going kosher

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 12:00am
By Cnaan Liphshiz for JTA


Portugal’s tallest mountain range, the Serra da Estrela, is famous for its breathtaking waterfalls, turquoise lakes, terraced hillsides and challenging bike paths amid vast woods.

In winter especially, tourists from all over northern Europe flock to the sunny Serra, a thinly populated plateau the size of Rhode Island, for its exquisite wines, world-renowned sheep cheeses and exotic regional dishes (think breaded sweet sardines and Juniper beef stew).

In addition to these delicacies, Serra da Estrela in recent years has also emerged as Portugal’s undisputed powerhouse for kosher food – an unlikely development in a region with about 50 Jews.

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Shemot

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 12:00am

Exodus 1:1-6:1 


Rabbi Michelle Missagieh for myjewishlearning.com 


Stop Making Excuses and Step Up to the Plate


Moses' excuses at the Burning Bush parallel three great human fears.


We often make excuses: “I’m too tired — I’ll just skip exercising this morning” … “It’s been a long week — maybe my co-worker won’t miss me at tonight’s shiva minyan for his father,” … or “It’s been months since I raised my voice to my child — she probably forgot, and I don’t need to apologize.”

Excuses often roll off the tip of our tongue. We’re too tired, frazzled, insecure, unsure, overwhelmed or distracted. Showing up emotionally and physically when we are called upon counts for a lot. Which is why it’s intriguing that Moses and God have such an intense connection at the Burning Bush, and then when God asks for Moses’ help in freeing the Israelites from slavery, the last thing Moses wants to do is show up and help God.

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Finding Positivity In A Negative World

Young-Adults - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 12:00am
by: Sheila Levy for Fresh Ink for Teens


Everyone faces adversity at some point in life, so learning how to cope is extremely important.


“Dancing in the rain” — the phrase that kept coming to mind as I sat in a room filled with my closest friends. As the hours went by, eyes watered and voices cracked, we continued to think about those four words. Inspirational story after story, chills started running up and down my body as we spoke about the deceased. The group healing was helpful and allowed us to think about how we can dance in a world that is filled with rain; how can we have a positive perspective on life when all we see is the negative.


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A Place for the Disabled: on Stage and Screen

Jewish-Arts-and-Media - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 12:00am
By Jennifer Richler for Tablet Magazine 


Jewish organizations are at the forefront of the battle for greater inclusion of people with disabilities, particularly in the performing arts

When the movie Wonder opened last month, some criticized the choice to have a nondisabled actor play the role of Auggie, a boy with severe facial disfigurement. For these critics, the decision was yet another example of the way people with disabilities are excluded.

Advocates for the disabled have long been fighting for greater inclusion of people with physical and cognitive disabilities in all spheres of life, particularly in education, recreation, and employment. Among the most vocal of these advocates are leaders of Jewish organizations who say Jewish values are at the core of their work. “Everything comes back to treating someone well. If you’re not doing that, you’re not living up to Jewish values,” said Lauren Appelbaum, communications director of RespectAbility, based in Rockville, Maryland. Though it is not a Jewish organization, several of its core staff have strong ties to the organized Jewish community. As such, the agency has made Jewish inclusion a priority, choosing students to serve as Jewish Inclusion Fellows and maintaining a Jewish Inclusion Facebook page. 

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Ten Things I’ve Learned After Two Bat Mitzvahs

Children-and-Familes - Mon, 01/01/2018 - 12:00am
By Marjorie Ingall for Tablet Magazine 


Party favors are Satan’s carnival prizes and other bits of wisdom from a seasoned organizer of rites of passage


My second daughter became a Bat Mitzvah a couple of weeks ago. Would you like to know what I’ve learned after ushering two girls through this process? Of course you would.

1.Choose the date well: If you can avoid a mortifying or stultifying Torah portion, do.

2. Pay attention to who your kid is: I had one child who wanted to lead every prayer, read the entire portion (plus hey, toss her the ones from the week before and after and she’d crush those, too), and fight with the entire synagogue about gendered language. I had another kid who… did not. Respect and understand that your child is their own person. Their concerns and values may not be yours. And HELLO, this is a celebration of Jewish adulthood, so insisting on calling all the shots yourself is hypocritical. Work with your kid, rabbi, cantor and education director to figure out how much your kid can and should do in the service. Steer between the Scylla of obsessiveness and the Charybdis of slackerdom. This is not easy.

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HAMANTASCHEN RECIPE HERE

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REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL

Sunday, February 25 at 4:00 PM

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brotherhood interfaith dinner

Tuesday, February 27 at 6:30 PM

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Beth El Lifelong Learning and JCCNV Joint Program

Sunday, March 18 at 2:00 PM

"Shattering Switzerland's Neutrality Myth:  The Inside Story of
the Investigation of Swiss Banks and Stolen Jewish Assets
During the Holocaust"

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2nd night passover seder

Saturday, March 31, 6:00 PM

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There are activities, meetings, services and seminars at Beth El each week, ranging from service opportunities to Jewish learning and education, drawing members and guests from throughout the Washington, D.C. area.

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