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My Nickname Was Retard: How I Survived Bullying

Young-Adults - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
by JerusalemU.org for aish.com


With no friends and no future in sight, Ben cried himself to sleep at night, even contemplating suicide. But then he had a revelation that changed everything.


“When everyone else has given up on you, it’s hard not to give up on yourself.” Ben is a fighter. And there are others out there. People who seem so ordinary - yet contain a hidden greatness. Watch the rest of Jerusalem U’s Hear Me Roar series, and meet young Jewish heroes who have overcome staggering obstacles to reveal their inner strength. Support Bullying Prevention Month, World Day of Bullying Prevention, National Stop Bullying Day, and Anti-Bullying Day - let’s put an end to bullying!

Watch video.

The Terrific ‘Beach Rats’ Isn’t Your Typical Gay Coming of Age Movie

LGBTQ - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
By: Nico Lang for intomore.com


The new film by Eliza Hittman is a complicated coming-of-age story that challenges how we think about queer films today.


Great movies often feel as though they are in conversation with other movies. Beach Rats, the second feature film from Eliza Hittman, is not quite a great movie, but it aspires to be one.

A tone poem about a young man struggling with his attraction to other men, Beach Rats recalls Saturday Night Fever, another film about frustrated masculinity set in blue-collar Brooklyn. Frankie, played by the electric Harris Dickinson, is a spiritual successor to Tony Manero. Both characters struggle to find themselves in an environment that doesn’t appear to have many options for the men they want to be. Beach Rats is the rare movie to feel like a descendant of both Kenneth Anger and Harmony Korine. Anger festishizes masculinity, whereas Korine explores the consequences when manhood isn’t fully realized.

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Straight Outta Satmar: Hear the Biggest Hasidic Hit of Right Now

Jewish-Arts-and-Media - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
By Liel Leibovitz for Tablet Magazine 


Go ahead, I dare you not to dance to Meilech Kohn’s ‘Ve’Uhavtu’


Growing up, Meilech Kohn didn’t like it in the Yeshiva. He was the quiet kid who liked to daydream and hum nice tunes, and his fellow students were so miffed by his strange ways that they shunned him altogether, refusing to speak to the awkward child. Increasingly distraught, he retreated into his inner world, which was increasingly consumed by writing songs and melodies. Eventually, he decided to drop out.

Much to the chagrin of his parents, Meilech left the fold of his tightly-knit Hasidic community. He moved to Los Angeles, then Puerto Rico, then Texas. He listened to any kind of music he could find, and continued to teach himself his craft. By the time he was ready to return home and recommit himself to religious life, he contained multitudes.

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Everything Bundt the Cake

Jewish-Food - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
Jamie Geller for The Joy of Kosher


15 BUNDT PAN RECIPES THAT AREN'T NECESSARILY CAKE


The bundt pan is the secret workhorse of your kitchen. Besides cakes, you can make kugels and breads as well as totally crazy dishes like roast chicken or lasagna.

Here are a few of our favorite bundt recipes that aren't necessarily cake (and a few that are).

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A Story for Hanukkah and Going to the Doctor

Children-and-Familes - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
From the blog of AnnKofsky.com


More than anything, Judah wants to be a good big brother to his baby sister, Hannah. He even uses his new Maccabee shield to protect her from danger!

On the last day of Hanukkah, during a visit to the doctor, Judah refuses to have his shot. Surely, his shield can protect him from germs, too!

This charming book teaches about Hanukkah and also about check-ups from their doctor and the importance of shots.

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Afghan Treasure

Jewish-Books - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
By Yoel Finkelman and Ofir Haim for Jewish Review of Books


A Collection of Long-Lost Manuscripts Sheds Light on Medieval Afghan Jewry


A few weeks before Rosh Hashanah sometime in the 11th century, a distraught, young Jewish Afghan young man named Yair sent a painful letter to his brother-in-law, Abu-al-Hasan Siman Tov. Life had dealt Yair a tough hand, or maybe it was just his own bad choices. Having failed in business in his hometown of Bamiyan, rumors were now spreading that he had “broken promises . . . regarding property” and that he did not truly “observe the Sabbath.” Leaving these problems behind him, he had left his young wife to move some 150 miles to Ghazni and begin anew. 

But even there he struggled to make a living. More importantly, he missed his family. “Anyone who marries a woman brings peace to his own mind, as it is for all people, not so that I will be sitting in Ghazni and she in Bamiyan.” But, with business doing so poorly, Yair could barely make ends meet on a day-to-day basis, let alone afford the costs of travel. 

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Disasters know no borders - MEFF joint international exercise

Israeli-News - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
From Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs


Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Authority collaborate in MiddleEast forest fires exercise.

 

 

The overall goal of the exercise is for participants to exchange knowledge and attain common capacities, to effectively respond to disaster situations, especially along and across mutual borders.

 


The Middle East Forest Fires (MEFF) joint international exercise taking place today (Tuesday, 24 October 2017), is conducted under the sponsorship of EU member states: Italy, France and Spain, and held in participation and under the positive cooperation of Jordan, Israel and the PA.

The joint exercise, supported by the European Commission's Civil Protection Exercise program, aims to preserve lives and natural resources, regardless of nationality and/or borders.

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The Many Ways to "Look" Jewish

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
BY RABBI RACHEL M. SOLOMIN for myjewishlearning.com 


The Jewish world is more ethnically and racially diverse than many people realize.


While the majority of American Jews are of Eastern European descent, that's not the case in Israel and France. From Ethiopian to Sephardic, learn about the many types of Jews.         

Watch video.

Internatonal Coastal Cleanup Day makes world beaches cleaner.

Going-Green-Jewishly - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
by Maurice Picow in Cities, posted on GreenProphet


Solid and liquid waste pollution on most world beaches is an issue that appears to be getting worse; despite efforts by volunteer environmentalists in the Middle East and elsewhere to make beaches cleaner and more eco friendly. Whether it be plastic littered beaches on such places as Midway Island, caused largely by plastic wastes accumulating in the Great North Pacific Gyre, or garbage carelessly thrown upon a Mediterranean beachfront,  coastal pollution is having a severe environmental impact worldwide.

Beginning on a single Texas beach in 1986, a worldwide International Coastal Cleanup day has resulted in millions of kilograms of plastic and other solid wastes being removed from world beachfronts and coastal waterways.

Continue reading.

Jews and Beer: 8 Surprising Facts

Feature-Article - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 12:00am
by Dr. Yvette Alt Miller for aish.com


For centuries Jews have been vital in the production and marketing of beer.


Here are 8 surprising facts about Jews and this history of this popular drink.


Ancient Origins
Beer-making dates to ancient times. Egyptian tombs depict pictures of beer brewing; Hammurabi’s Code, from 18th century BCE Mesopotamia, mentions beer; the ancient Greeks learned how to brew beer from Egyptians and brought this knowledge to Europe.

Ancient Israel, in contrast, favored wine over beer. But after the destruction of the ancient Temple in Jerusalem in 586 BCE, Jews were exiled to nearby Babylonia and adopted the Babylonian taste for beer. The Talmud records four different types of beer, brewed from barley, dates, figs and beer (Pesachim 107a). The modern usage of hops, a plant related to mulberries, in beer is also mentioned in the Talmud, which notes hops’ medicinal properties of being a preservative and antiseptic (Avodah Zarah 31b).

Continue reading.

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HAMANTASCHEN RECIPE HERE

Please see calendar for baking dates

 

REELABILITIES FILM FESTIVAL

Sunday, February 25 at 4:00 PM

Click here for details
 

brotherhood interfaith dinner

Tuesday, February 27 at 6:30 PM

Please Click Here for Details
Please Click Here to RSVP

 

Beth El Lifelong Learning and JCCNV Joint Program

Sunday, March 18 at 2:00 PM

"Shattering Switzerland's Neutrality Myth:  The Inside Story of
the Investigation of Swiss Banks and Stolen Jewish Assets
During the Holocaust"

RSVP HERE

 

2nd night passover seder

Saturday, March 31, 6:00 PM

Click Here for Details
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There are activities, meetings, services and seminars at Beth El each week, ranging from service opportunities to Jewish learning and education, drawing members and guests from throughout the Washington, D.C. area.

the full calendar