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ADAMA OPENS GLOBAL R&D CENTER IN SOUTHERN ISRAEL

Israeli-News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:00am
A researcher works at ADAMA's new global R&D center in Ne'ot Hovav. (photo credit: NATALIE COHEN-KADOSH)


BY EYTAN HALON for JPost


The new research complex will focus on all stages of development, from basic chemical research to the development of active processes and materials, and to a final product for farmers.


ADAMA, the world’s leading generic crop protection company, inaugurated its multi-million dollar advanced global research and development center on Tuesday in the southern industrial zone of Ne’ot Hovav.

The Tel Aviv-headquartered company, acquired by Beijing-based chemical company ChemChina in 2017, will initially welcome more than 100 researchers and chemists to its new agricultural research hub, and is expected to expand in the future.

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Interfaith Families Increasingly Jewish

Interfaith - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:00am
By STEWART AIN for The Jewish Week


Palm Beach County finds two-thirds of such couples raising Jewish children.


At the same time the rate of intermarriage among non-Orthodox Jews continues to rise, so does the percentage of such couples who are raising their children as Jews, according to Jewish population surveys conducted in recent years.

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Tu B'Shvat: What Is A Birthday For Trees?

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:00am

This video is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


From AlephBeta 


What Is Tu B'Shvat And Why Do We Celebrate?


Every year, we celebrate the strange Jewish holiday of Tu B’Shvat – according to the Talmud, it’s a birthday for all of the trees born in the previous year. And not just a birthday – it’s really a “new year” for the trees. How odd is that? In this video, Imu Shalev breaks down this strange holiday to uncover what Tu B’Shvat really means to us today. Discover how Tu B’Shvat is actually all about gratitude to our Creator, for the fruits of the trees.

Watch video. 

The Relevance of Celebrating Tu B’Shevat

Going-Green-Jewishly - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:00am

This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


By Paula Maccabee for Hadassah Magazine


Many of us dismiss Tu B’Shevat as a tree-planting holiday for children. And for those of us who live in the northern hemisphere, the holiday often falls during the depths of winter, making the “New Year of the Trees” seem misplaced. But Jewish learning and our natural environment require that we reclaim Tu B’Shevat—which this year begins the evening of January 20—as an important holiday to celebrate our relationship with Creation and take responsibility to protect the web of life on Earth.

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Why We Eat the 7 Fruits on Tu B’Shvat

Feature-Article - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:00am

This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, 


By Jo Ann Gardner for The Forward


The seven species are pomegranate, grapes, dates, figs, olives, wheat and barley.

Why do we eat fruit of the Seven Species on Tu B’Shvat?

The Seven Species of the Bible are a central feature of the celebration of Tu B’Shvat, which this year occurs in late January. The reason usually given for eating foods from this group, especially its fruits, is that they are symbols of God’s creation, and that by eating them we give thanks to Him and reaffirm our ties to the Land of Israel.

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‘Deeply illiberal’ shechita ban condemned by UK Jewish leaders

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
From Times of Israel/JewishNews


President of the Board says the decision is a "major set-back" to the country's reputation as being progressive and urges a re-think


UK Jewish representatives have said Belgium’s ban on shechita “offends against the human right of relisious freedom” after the country’s law to stop non-stun slaughter took effect.

The implementation of the ban, which came into effect in the region of Flanders on 1 January, will impact on both the country’s Jewish and Muslim communities, and European Jewish figures say it “puts Jewish life at risk” and runs counter to public pronouncements from politicians that Jewish life should be protected.

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Bo

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am

Exodus 10:1−13:16 


By Rabbi Sarah Bassin for ReformJudaism.org


Thinking Big and Failing Fast


Think big. As a society, we value those who step beyond the status quo, who push us beyond what we think is possible. We think of them as heroic — because they possess a talent that we do not.

But what if thinking big were not a talent but a skill to be cultivated — something even God had to practice?


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At the Jewish Media Summit, a Focus on Young American Jews

Young-Adults - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
BY LEV GRINGAUZ for newvoices.org


Though 150 journalists and bloggers from 30 countries had gathered in Jerusalem for the Israeli Press Office-sponsored Jewish New Media Summit in late November, American Jewry was very nearly the only subject of conversation when discussing the strained relationship between Israel and the Jewish Diaspora.

 

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101st Rose Queen Says She’s The First Jewish And First LGBTQ Queen

LGBTQ - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am

BY MARCY OSTER FOR THE FORWARD

(JTA) — Louise Deser Siskel, a high school senior who will preside over the New Year’s Day Tournament of Roses Parade, says she is the first Jewish Rose queen in the parade’s 101-year history.

Siskel, 18, also told the local media that she is the first LGBTQ queen and the first queen that wears glasses, though none of these firsts have been officially verified.

 

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Author Lemony Snicket’s ‘Jewish story’ on Netflix

Jewish-Arts-and-Media - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
BY JOSH WEISS for JWeekly


Almost 20 years since the publication of “The Bad Beginning” and 13 years (a fittingly unlucky figure) since its film adaptation, Netflix has given Lemony Snicket’s book series, “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” new life. All eight episodes of the first season were released on Jan. 13.

Filled with incredible actors, breathtaking set designs and an engaging plot infused with humor and melancholy, the new show is everything fans could have hoped for after all this time.

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In Israel, it’s knafeh that takes the cake

Jewish-Food - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
By Jessica Halfin for Israel21c


As the sweet, sticky, cheesy treat has entered contemporary cuisine, knafeh is open to interpretation by home cooks, restaurant chefs and hipsters.


In South Tel Aviv, in a gentrified historical neighborhood called Florentin, British immigrant Dean Essa recently opened a new culinary hangout, Kanafanji.

It may look like a hip espresso bar, but Kanafanji specializes in knafeh (also spelled “kanafeh”), an Arabic dessert made with shredded vermicelli-like pastry noodles (kadaif) moistened with clarified butter, covered with crumbles of sheep or goat cheese and seared on both sides until golden. Before serving, the knafeh is showered in spiced heavy syrup.

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Game Apps for Your Child to Learn About Ecosystems, Habitats & Biomes

Children-and-Familes - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am

This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


By Yonah Kirschner, DigitalJlearning


As the Jewish holiday most closely connected to the environment and the natural world, Tu Bishvat provides a great opportunity for teachers to include earth and environmental science in their curriculum. This year, we were inspired by Jewish texts about the natural world. For each text, we’ve taken out a particular topic you can focus on in your classroom and provided educational technology resources that can help your students reach their learning goals. Our hope is that after using these tools and developing a stronger understanding of Earth, your students will have a more meaningful Tu Bishvat.

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The Scroll’s Year in Review

Jewish-Books - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
By The Scroll for Tablet Magazine 


Some 2018 reading you might have missed to catch up on in the year ahead


A few weeks ago we offered a neat, numbered list of the “Tablet Top 10: An entirely subjective list, presented in no particular order, of our 10 favorite articles from Tablet’s Arts & Culture and News & Politics sections in 2018.“

That was the formal affair; ‘entirely subjective’ yes, but, nevertheless, presented with all the prestige and institutional authority of the Tablet imprimatur. Today, in a rather more impulsive and personal manner, The Scroll offers some ad hoc recommendations of its own from outside the Tablet universe. 

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Zionist Union party dissolves ahead of elections

Israeli-News - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
By David Isaac, World Israel News 

 

The Zionist Union, a party which combined the Israeli Labor Party and the Hatnuah Party, has broken up ahead of elections.


The Zionist Union, a joint list of the Israeli Labor Party and the Hatnuah Party, has broken up ahead of Knesset elections scheduled for April 9.

Labor Party leader Avi Gabbay informed Tzipi Livni, leader and founder of Hatnuah and fellow leader with Gabbay of the Zionist Union, that he was dissolving the pact between the two factions.

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Tu Bishvat

Interfaith - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am

This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily.com 


For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit Jvillage Network's Tu Bishvat Guide. 


Tu Bishvat and some of the other smaller holidays—Sukkot, Shavuot, Purim—can be great ways to introduce Jewish partners to the beauty of Judaism. Every winter, just as we start to think about spring, a minor holiday comes along. Minor enough that not all of us know what it means or how it came to be. The resources on this page can help you and your family learn about the wonder of Tu Bishvat.

The upcoming dates for Tu Bishvat are:

Beginning at sundown on: January 20, 2019; February 9, 2020; January 28, 2021.

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The Modern-day Appeal of Tu B’Shevat

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

By Jenna Weissman Joselit for Tablet Magazine 


The Jewish New Year of the Trees demands little of us, but offers us a chance to connect our roots with good causes, new rituals, and recipes


If ever there was a holiday ripe for revitalization and collective embrace, it’s Tu B’Shevat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees. Falling smack in the middle of winter, when the weather is usually not at its best, the age-old festival, which some scholars date to the early Middle Ages, heralds the prospect of regeneration, of sunnier days ahead. That alone should commend it to North American Jews, lifting their spirits when they sag under the weight of gloves and hats and scarves, their movement impeded by the heavy tread of boots.

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6 Israeli Cleantech Companies Putting Sustainability at the Top of Their Agenda

Going-Green-Jewishly - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
By Klara Strube, NoCamels


For at least several decades, an overwhelming majority of climate scientists have agreed that global warming trends are occurring at a faster pace and are primarily driven by greenhouse gases emitted by human activities.

But the issue has become highly politicized, especially in the United States, even as new evidence emerges that urgent action is required. Hurricanes, floods, disease outbreaks are all set to worsen over the next decades if international efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions are not fruitful. At the UN this week, 190 countries agreed to a universal, transparent set of rules on how nations can cut gas emissions but delayed more concrete, impactful decisions.

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Top 10 Jewish stories of 2018

Feature-Article - Mon, 01/07/2019 - 12:00am
From religionnews.com


(RNS) — The brutality of anti-Semitism in several forms dominated the top 10 news stories related to Jews and Judaism this year. But there were important and even happy developments as well.

 

1. The Tree of Life synagogue shooting


The “slaughter of the innocents” in a Pittsburgh synagogue in October was the single worst anti-Jewish attack in U.S. history, with 11 worshippers killed (among them were two of my cousins, Cecil and David Rosenthal). The swift public revulsion and denunciation of the massacre cut across all religious, ethnic and racial boundaries and resulted in a vast outpouring of support for the American Jewish community.

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With Intermarriage Endorsement, Rabbi Hopes To Start ‘Grass Roots’ Movement

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 12/31/2018 - 12:00am
By Ari Feldman for The Forward
 

A synagogue in Virginia has issued a statement saying it’s in favor of Conservative rabbis presiding at interfaith weddings even though the movement still officially bans the practice.

In a Facebook post, the synagogue’s rabbi said that its board had voted to allow its clergy to marry a Jewish person to a non-Jewish person, but only when the movement formally allows its rabbis to do so. That means the vote and the statement are symbolic.

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Vaera

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 12/31/2018 - 12:00am

Exodus 6:2-9:35 
 

By Rabbi Sarah Bassin for ReformJudaism.org
 

Shortness of Breath, Shortness of Spirit
 

High school wasn’t great for me. I functioned at the periphery of social groups, laying low and laughing at jokes made at my expense so as not to be excommunicated into social oblivion. The weekend I left for college, I never once second guessed my decision until the moment my parents said goodbye and drove off. Watching that van pull away, it suddenly hit me that I was fully alone. I was 1,200 miles away from anyone who knew me. Every worst-case scenario flooded my brain in that instant. What if it were worse than high school? What if I didn’t find any friends or a group of friends? What if I failed my classes? What if none of the clubs wanted me? I froze. I wanted nothing more than to return to the familiar — to go back home. I must have stood there looking shell-shocked for a solid five minutes before a kind orientation leader coaxed me out of my stupor to some ice-breakers and what turned out to be the start of a fulfilling college experience.  

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Beth El is raising funds for a new playground?

Beth El is getting a new playground!  If you would like to donate towards this very worthy project, simply send your donations to Beth El Hebrew Congregation and notate "Playground."  If you donate on line, the playground fund is first on the list!

 

Lifelong Learning

Wednesdays during the school year
@ 7:00 PM
See calendar for exact dates and subjects

 

ALIVE!

For more information about ALIVE! go to alive-inc.org.

Upcoming Events

 

We have a very special service January 18 at 7:30 p.m. in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. and his heroic work.

We will be joined by our talented 5th grade class and singer-songwriter, LEA.

Trivia Night

Come for a fast and fun night of trivia, food and comaraderie on Saturday, March 2, 2019, 6:00 pm, at Beth El.  Adults and teens (7th grade and up) can play!  The cost is $35 per person (includes: dinner and participation), BYOB.  Bring cash to buy optional extra chits to help your table become the champion!  Separate, supervised Kids Night Out - $10 per child (6th grade and younger; includes casual dinner, movie & games).  RSVP: by Monday, February 18, Advance Ticket Sales Only. Register here  Questions: Contact Anne Levy, [email protected]  Proceeds will go to the Beth El Playground Fund.

Please sign up for Ushering at Beth El for Friday Night Services ​

This is a great opportunity to see and meet fellow congregants.Please use the link to sign up:

 

Support During Shutdown                         

As the frustrating government shutdown drags on, we extend our sympathies during this anxious time for you and your family. While Beth El Hebrew Congregation is not a direct service provider, we can offer temporary dues relief until the shutdown has ended. We hope this resource list can be an asset during this difficult time and pray for an immediate resolution:

 

What Furloughed Workers Need to Know About Filing for Unemployment Benefits: https://tinyurl.com/yd3v7w29

A Furloughed Federal Employee’s Guide to Filing for Unemployment: https://tinyurl.com/y9qltsjt

U.S. Office of Personnel Management Furlough Guidance: tps://tinyurl.com/y8sg3mum

Alexandria Center for Economic Support: https://tinyurl.com/yd66o7mj

Coordinated Services Fairfax County: https://tinyurl.com/y8f9e4vg

Local Restaurants Offering Free or Discounted Meals and More: https://tinyurl.com/ybmozmt3

 

                  


 

There are activities, meetings, services and seminars at Beth El each week, ranging from service opportunities to Jewish learning and education, drawing members and guests from throughout the Washington, D.C. area.

the full calendar